Total hip arthroplasty through the direct anterior approach with and without the use of a traction table: a matched-control, retrospective, single-surgeon study.

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Hip surgeons performing total hip arthroplasty (THA) through the direct anterior approach (DAA) commonly use a traction table to facilitate exposure. Even though performing THA through DAA without a traction table could be technically more demanding, this technique offers the advantage of intraoperative leg length comparison. Therefore, this study aimed to compare clinical outcomes, complication rates, component positioning, and leg length discrepancy (LLD) after THA through the DAA performed with or without a traction table.A single-surgeon continuous series of 75 patients who underwent DAA THA performed with a traction table was matched for gender, age, and BMI with 75 patients who underwent DAA THA performed without a traction table (male, 62; female, 88, with an average age of 68 years old). Clinical and radiological outcomes, intra- and postoperative complications, and LLD were retrospectively assessed.No statistically significant difference was detected in surgical time, hospital stay, Harris Hip Score (HHS), complication rates, and implant positioning between the two groups. Leg length restoration was significantly more accurate in the group performed without a traction table (2.4 ± 2 mm vs. 3.7 ± 3.1 mm; p value ≤ 0.05). No LLD > 10 mm was reported in the group performed without a traction table, whereas two cases (2.7%) were reported in those performed with a traction table.Performing THA through DAA without a traction table was associated with a significantly more accurate leg length restoration without a significant increase in the rates of intra- and postoperative complications.

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