Pain Prevalence, Chronicity and Impact within Subpopulations Based on Both Hispanic Ancestry and Race: United States, 2010-2017.

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We provide national surveillance estimates of pain chronicity, severity and impact in adult subpopulations defined by both Hispanic Ancestry and Race. Data are from 144,434 adults who completed validated questionnaires in the 2010-2017 National Health Interview Survey asking about pain status within the last three (n=84,664) or six months (n=59,770). Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between pain and ethnicity/race. Compared to White Puerto Rican participants, White participants with Central/South American and Mexican ancestry had reduced odds of reporting Category 3-4 pain and High-Impact Chronic Pain (HICP), while those of Cuban ancestry had reduced odds of only HICP – e.g., White participants with Mexican ancestry had 32% lower odds of having Category 3-4 pain and 50% lower odds of having HICP. While no differences were seen between White Puerto Rican and White Non-Hispanic participants for Category 3-4 pain, White Non-Hispanics had 40% lower odds of reporting HICP. Asian Non-Hispanic and Black Non-Hispanic participants had significantly lower odds of reporting Category 3-4 pain and HICP compared to White Puerto Rican participants, e.g., Black Non-Hispanic participants had 26% lower odds off having Category 3-4 pain and 42% lower odds of having HICP. Perspective: By examining pain status in discrete demographic groups based on Hispanic Ancestry and Race, this report further documents substantial differences in health status among underserved populations and provides a baseline for continuing surveillance research on pain, with the eventual goal of eliminating disparities in pain assessment and treatment.

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Authors: Richard L Nahin