Effect of Surgery for Stress Incontinence on Female Sexual Function.

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To evaluate the effects of four different surgical interventions for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) on 2-year postoperative sexual function.This is a combined secondary analysis of SISTEr (Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial) and TOMUS (Trial of Mid-Urethral Slings). Women in the original trials were randomized to receive surgical treatment for SUI with an autologous fascial sling or Burch colposuspension (SISTEr), or a retropubic or transobturator midurethral sling (TOMUS). Sexual function (assessed by the short version of the PISQ-12 [Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire]) was compared between groups at baseline, 12 and 24 months. Secondarily, the effects of subjective and objective surgical cure rates and the effect of concomitant surgical procedures on 24-month sexual function was explored.Nine hundred twenty-four women were included in this study: 249 (26.9%) had an autologous fascial sling, 239 (25.9%) underwent Burch colposuspension, 216 (23.3%) had a retropubic midurethral sling placed, and 220 (23.8%) had transobturator midurethral sling placed. Baseline characteristics (including PISQ-12 scores) were similar between the four treatment arms, with notable exceptions including race-ethnicity, prolapse stage, concomitant surgery, and number of vaginal deliveries. After adjustment for differences between the groups, there was a clinically important improvement in PISQ-12 scores over the 24-month postoperative period for all treatment groups, with no significant differences attributed to the type of anti-incontinence procedure (baseline PISQ-12: 32.6, 33.1, 31.9, 31.4; 24-month PISQ-12: 37.7, 37.8, 36.9, 37.1, P

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