Comparison of Short and Long Term Cardiovascular Outcomes After Bariatric Surgery in Patients With vs Without Coronary Artery Disease.

There is little data regarding the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to assess the short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes of patients with CAD undergoing bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of CAD were identified from a dedicated database with prospectively collected outcomes, comprising all 6795 patients who underwent bariatric surgery between January 1992 and October 2017. Patients were matched with patients who did not have CAD before the bariatric surgery procedure. The primary endpoints were mortality (cardiac and noncardiac) and major adverse cardiocerebral events (MACCE), including all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and myocardial revascularization at 30 days after bariatric surgery and throughout follow-up. After propensity score matching, 249 patients with chronic CAD were matched with 249 patients without CAD. Throughout follow-up (7.4 years; interquartile range 4.1 to 11.5, maximum 22 years), mortality (mainly cardiac mortality) remained significantly higher in the CAD compared with the non-CAD group (18% vs 10%, hazard ratio [HR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 2.79, p = 0.037). At 30 days, MACCE rate was significantly higher in the CAD compared with the non-CAD group (3.6% vs 0.4%, p = 0.011), essentially driven by non-ST elevation myocardial infarctions. After 30 days, MACCE rates remained significantly higher in the CAD group (30% vs 14%, HR 2.18, 95% CI: 1.45-3.28, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, patients with severe obesity and CAD referred to bariatric surgery were at a higher risk of early and late MACCE compared with non-CAD severely obese patients. Further study is required to define how this cardiovascular risk compares with nonoperated patients.

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