Chondrosarcoma of the hands and feet.

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A multicentre retrospective study was carried out at two tertiary sarcoma centres. A database search identified all patients with a CS treated between January 1995 and January 2018. There were 810 CSs of which 76 (9.4%) were located in the fingers, toes, metacarpals, and metatarsal bones.The median age of the study population was 55 years (36 to 68) with a median follow-up of 52 months (22 to 87) months. Overall, 70% of the tumours were in the hand (n = 54) and 30% in the foot (n = 22). Predictors for LR were margin (p = 0.011), anatomical location (p = 0.017), and method of surgical management (p = 0.003). Anatomical location (p = 0.026), histological grade between 1 and 3 (p = 0.004) or 2 and 3 (p = 0.016), and surgical management (p = 0.001) were significant factors for LR-free survival. Disease-specific survival was affected by histological grade (p < 0.001), but not by LR (p = 0.397).Intralesional curettage of a low-grade CS is associated with an increased risk of LR, but LR does not affect disease-specific survival. Therefore, for low-grade CSs of the hands and feet, surgical management should aim to preserve function. In grade 2 CS, our study did not show any decreased disease-specific survival after recurrence; however, we suggest a more aggressive surgical approach to these tumours to prevent local recurrence, especially in the metacarpal and metatarsal bones. In high-grade tumours, the incidence of progressive disease is high and, therefore, the treatment of the primary tumour should be aggressive where possible, and patients observed closely for the development of metastatic disease. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2021;103-B(3):562-568.

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Authors: Gilber Kask, Minna K Laitinen, Jonathan Stevenson, Scott Evans, Lee M Jeys, Michael C Parry