Changes in 3-month mineral and bone disorder patterns were associated with all-cause mortality in prevalent hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism.

Please login or register to bookmark this article
Bookmark this %label%

There is limited evidence on the association between short-term changes in mineral and bone disorder parameters and survival in maintenance hemodialysis patients.We investigated the association between changing patterns of phosphorus, calcium and intact parathyroid hormone levels and all-cause mortality in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Each parameter was divided into three categories (low [L], middle [M] and high [H]), and the changing patterns between two consecutive visits at 3-month intervals were categorized into nine groups (e.g., L-L and M-H). The middle category was defined as 4.0-7.0 mg/dL for phosphorous, 8.5-9.5 mg/dL for calcium and 200-500 pg/mL for intact parathyroid hormone. Adjusted incidence rates and rate ratios were analyzed by weighted Poisson regression models accounting for time-dependent exposures.For phosphorus, shifts from low/high to middle category (L-M/H-M) were associated with a lower mortality compared with the L-L and H-H groups, whereas shifts from middle to low/high category (M-L/M-H) were associated with a higher mortality compared with the M-M group. For calcium, shifts from low/middle to high category (L-H/M-H) were associated with a higher mortality compared with the L-L and M-M groups, whereas shifts from high to middle category (H-M) were associated with a lower mortality compared with the H-H group. For intact parathyroid hormone, shifts from low to middle category (L-M) were associated with a lower mortality compared with the L-L group.Changes in the 3-month patterns of phosphorus and calcium toward the middle category were associated with lower mortality. Our study also suggests the importance of avoiding hypercalcemia.

View the full article @ BMC nephrology
Get PDF with LibKey