A widening gap between boys and girls in musculoskeletal complaints, while growing up from age 11 to age 20 – The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study.

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The adolescent years represent a key period for the development of musculoskeletal complaints (MSC) and the differences between boys and girls. We evaluated the prevalence and course of MSC and factors associated with MSC while growing up from age 11 to age 20.Questionnaire-based data at age 11 (n=2638), age 14 (n=2517), age 17 (n=2094) and at age 20 (n=2206) from the ongoing Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort were analyzed. MSC refers to pain of lower back, upper- and/or lower extremities. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate a number of factors in relation to persistent pain (pain reported at three out of four measurements).Prevalence of MSC increased from 14.2% at age 11 to 22.1% at age 20 for boys, and from 17.4% at age 11 to 37.9% at age 20 for girls. Persistent pain was found among 5.1% of the boys and 16.5% of the girls. Being bullied, sleeping problems and tiredness during the day were significantly associated with persistent pain, in both boys and girls, while the latter two were more prevalent among girls. Self-reported (sports-)accidents, and among girls also early onset of puberty, were also significantly associated with persistent pain, but lifestyle factors, such as physical activity and smoking, were not.Prevalence of MSC increases during adolescence, with a widening gap between boys and girls. The factors associated with MSC are similar in boys and girls, though the prevalence of some of these differ by sex.

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This is an abstract of the clinical research article “A widening gap between boys and girls in musculoskeletal complaints, while growing up from age 11 to age 20 – The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study.” This clinical research article was published in the medical journal European journal of pain (London, England) on 2021-01-06 and has been categorised as belonging to the clinical specialty of Pain management. To read the full clinical research article or obtain a PDF (if available) use the links directly above. To discover more of the latest Pain management clinical research articles from the medical journal European journal of pain (London, England) please click the link below. For more of the latest Pain management research articles from other leading medical journals click the link that says Pain management next to the stethoscope icon at the top of the page. You can further filter clinical research articles by sub-specialties within Pain management using the navigation menu at the top of the page.